Other Growth Factors: PDGF-BB and VEGF

Our wound-healing team also utilizes a growth factor called platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) which, like GM-CSF, has been shown to promote angiogenesis (blood vessel formation) and tissue growth in DFUs in clinical trials. In addition, we've also conducted (and continue to conduct) ground-breaking research on the wound-healing properties of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which has been shown to stimulate growth of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes in clinical trials.

How VEGF Stimulates Wound Healing

 

VEGF and the cellular basis of healing: Note the multiple roles that the body’s cells play in producing VEGF in the local wound environment. Platelets arrive first on Day “0” of wounding, followed by a peak of macrophages on Day 2. Endothelial cells begin to migrate at Day 2, and new capillary endothelium can be seen forming between Days 3 and 4. By Day 5, new collagen is produced from fibroblasts. The initial cells that release VEGF are platelets which enter the wound after debridement. Macrophages also release VEGF.

How VEGF works to heal wounds: VEGF stimulates endothelial cells (cells that line the blood vessels and lymph vessles) to proliferate and migrate. VEGF has also been shown to stimulate keratinocyte migration and collagen production via fibroblasts. In addition, VEGF secretion induces release of other growth factors, which further stimulate healing.

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